Addiction is a disease that’s often accompanied by other disorders. One of these is codependency. Unfortunately, being codependent can make it much harder to get substance abuse help. Take a closer look at what it means to be codependent and explore the best options for recovery.

A woman struggles with codependencyWhat Is Codependency?

Codependency is when a person puts the needs of another above their own needs. It is common in relationships because one person will always help the other and do everything possible to make their life easier.

Therefore, it’s important to see codependent behavior as a two-way street. One side of the equation is the person who always needs help. He or she may always feel like a victim or request help.

The other side of the relationship is the caregiver. This is the person who gives help and wants to control the situation for others. In many cases, these two parties fall into a pattern that ultimately hurts both of them.

Why Is Codependent Behavior Linked to Addiction?

Codependent behavior and addiction is a very common combination. Typically, one person struggles with addiction, and the other person acts as the protector and caregiver. This is unhealthy for both people and often hurts the recovery process.

When a person is overcoming addiction, they need to confront the consequences of their actions. In a codependent relationship, however, this rarely ever happens. A loved one might lie to protect someone with a drug addiction, or they might offer money, support, and a place to stay.

Family members and friends often fall into codependent patterns simply because they don’t know what else to do. By helping a loved one who is struggling with addiction, you might actually be enabling their dangerous behavior. Often, the best way to act is to help them find professional treatment in a rehabilitation program.

Accepting Personal Responsibility

When a person seeks help for addiction, they remove themselves from the codependent relationship. In many ways, this is a positive step toward recovery. On your own, you can start to accept personal responsibility for your choices.

Addiction is an illness, not a moral shortcoming or a choice. However, how you overcome the disease does involve a commitment to the recovery process. Overall, you have to choose to stay on track and accept help from experts and medical professionals along the way. These choices can give you the strength and wisdom to prevent future relapse and begin sober living.

The Need for Family Counseling

Those struggling with addiction need treatment in order to recover. However, other family members also benefit from therapy. In family therapy, participants learn the difference between helping and enabling. Thus, they better understand the nature of addiction and can explore supporting loved ones in a positive, helpful way. Above all, families can establish healthy forms of communication for the future.

Addressing Codependent Behavior at Soledad House

At Soledad House, women are able to confront issues like codependent behavior while also working to overcome addiction. This is all possible thanks to the creation of a treatment plan that focuses on the physical, emotional, spiritual, and psychological health of each individual client.

The treatment methods available include the following:

12 step programs
Family counseling
Group therapy
Psychotherapy
• Holistic therapies for overall wellness

Codependency is a common issue for those overcoming addiction. At Soledad House in San Diego, California, it’s the main focus of a comprehensive treatment plan. Call 866-314-3222 if you’re ready to take the next step toward the life you deserve.